January 20, 2012 | Posted in Business Applications, Enterprise, Managed File Transfer, Megaupload, Secure Platform | By

Feds Shutter Megaupload, Arrest Executives

Megaupload was based on a consumerization model, aka freemium service. This is where a vendor supports “free” users, working to convert the “free” users into paying customers.  By offering a freemium model, the task of governing millions of users and what they upload & download is simply impossible, not to mention costly.

What we have seen is that the easy accessibility of these types of services becomes very attractive to a large percentage of the population and will often creep into the corporate environment.  According to The Application Usage and Risk Report by Palo Alto Networks, which monitored a week’s worth of traffic at 1,636 medium to large size businesses around the world, Megaupload traffic was found on 57% of corporate networks and Dropbox was being used at 76% of these organizations. These unsanctioned file sharing applications, which bypass security policies and use vast amounts of corporate bandwidth, are not going away until enterprises incorporate efficient and secure ways to allow their non-technical staff members and external partners to communicate.   Executives need to be concerned that once these types of unregulated systems, using a platform with millions of users, creep into the corporate environment, organizations are opening themselves up to huge security risks.

Megaupload, Dropbox, and Box.net all have their place in the “consumer” world, but were they built to accommodate the critical business and security requirements of the enterprise?  If you are one of the medium to large size businesses that have seen freemium services creep into your network, then it’s time to consider a service that was built solely to meet enterprise needs, a secure managed file transfer solution that can directly integrate with your email infrastructure or CRM system allowing non-technical staff members and external partners to communicate directly.  It’s time to consider Thru, Inc.

1 Comment

  1. John Hotten
    April 15, 2012

    Leave a Reply

    Some of these filesharing services allow viruses to enter their system. This is really degrading and would damage corporate businesses if they are not careful. Thank you for this information.

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